PMCS
Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services

Our feet only can take us so far. Most of our combat engineer tasks require equipment to accomplish our mission from digging vehicle fighting positions to launching bridges off AVLBs. As a soldier you’re the first line of defense against equipment failure by doing your basic PMCS tasks each battle assemble. The Army lays out specifically how to accomplish the required checks and services in Training Manuals associated with every weapon, vehicle, and piece of equipment. Below you will find links to common equipment you’ll need to work on and their manuals. 

When the Army publishes a Technical Manual (TM) it has several versions. The first one always ends with “-10” in the title, such as TM-9-2350-277-10. That is why you will often hear someone say, “That is a ‘dash’ 10 level task” or “that is an operator level task”. The -10 version of the training manual represents tasks that the Army says every operator of that vehicle should know how to do. The other versions -20, -30, -40 are for higher level of maintenance personnel to know. It not only tells you what to do, but how to do it step by step with easy to understand pictures. It teaches you.

To conduct a proper PMCS you need a DA Form 5988, DA Form 2404, and the Technical Manual. A 5988 is a print out with all the existing issues known about the equipment. The DA Form 2404 is where you record any new faults found. If you are going to operate the equipment it should be dispatched to you from the FMT team. You’ll sign a DA 5987 and record the mileage. If you conduct PMCS without these forms you can’t record what was done.

To use a TM to do your -10 level tasks, open it to the table of contents and find the chapter for Preventative Maintenance Checks and Services. It will tell you what to do before, during, and after operating the equipment as well as what services are due daily, weekly, or monthly. During a battle assembly use this as a reference to help you complete tasks required if you are going to operate the equipment or if you are assigned routine tasks that are due for service. It can also teach you how to operate the equipment if it’s been awhile. Since these are digital files, you use control + F or the find feature on your device to quickly get to the page you want.

Here is an example of a PMCS table from a -10 TM for the M113A3 (click on it to expand the image):

View TM 9-2350-277-10

PMCS starts in Chapter 4 on page 009-009-9 (search for that number on your device)

View TM 5-5420-202-10

PMCS starts on Chapter 4 page 0048-2 (search for that number on your device)

 

View TM 9-2320-387-10

HMMWV stands for High Mobility Multi-Wheeled Vehicle. There are many variants of the HMMWV but for the most part the PMCS task remain very similar. The 744 has two versions: A “2-seater” with model number M1152A1 and a “4-seater” with model number “M1165A1”.

PMCS starts in Chapter 2 on page 2-29 (search for that number on your device)

M1152A1

M1165A1

View TM 9-2320-365-10

Some versions of the LMTV are armored and some are not, but they fall in the same family of vehicles.

PMCS starts in Chapter 2 on page 2-30 (search for that number on your device)

View TM 9-2320-345-10

LHS stands for Load Handling System and they are distinctive because of their perpendicular arm and 8 wheels – don’t confuse it with a PLS.

PMCS starts in Chapter 4 on page 0156-1 (search for that number on your device)

View TM 9-2320-364-10

PLS stands for Palletized Load System and they are distinctive because of their perpendicular arm and 10 wheels – don’t confuse it with an LHS.

PMCS starts in Chapter 2 on page 2-55 (search for that number on your device)

View TM 9-2320-343-10

HEMTT stands for Heavy Expanded Tactical Truck and it is distinctive from the LHS and PLS because it does not have a perpendicular arm on the back.

PMCS starts in Chapter 4 on page 0141-1 (search for that number on your device)

View TM 9-2320-342-10

The Wrecker is used by FMT (Field Maintenance Team) for vehicle recovery. It is distinctive from the LHS, PLS, and HEMTT because it has a tow arm on the back side.

PMCS starts in Chapter 4. This -10 is divided into two manuals. Due to the size, it is recommended checking out the paper copy from the FMT office.

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